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Fooling the police with a ‘safety belt T-shirt’ in China

Published on March 2, 2013 by Tycho de Feijter

Fooling the police with a 'safety belt T-shirt' in China

Chinese drivers who don’t like to wear a safety belt can now buy an innovative ‘safety belt T-shirt’, priced between 35 yuan and 50 yuan in various online shops. Chinese police is more alert on safety belts after a few high profile accidents where occupants were launched trough car windows and ended up very dead. The penalty for not wearing a safety belt is 50 yuan and a deduction of two points, out of 12, of the driver’s license.

Fooling the police with a 'safety belt T-shirt' in China

Drivers hope the T-shirts will fool a busy policeman when he looks quickly inside. The shirts attracted attention from Chinese media who asked the police what they thought about all this.

Spokesman Xue Fengxian from the Shanghai Public Security Bureau Traffic Police Detachment said the driver of a vehicle is required by law to use seat belts. Wearing the T-shirt however, is not illegal in itself. Another spokesman, this time in Heilongjiang Province, called wearing the T-shirts “self-deceptive”, but also said wearing the shirts for “entertainment purposes” was allowed.

Well, with such a friendly police corps we expect sales of these shirts to go through the window roof.

Via Sohu, HJnews, iqilu, Toabao.

 

23 thoughts on “Fooling the police with a ‘safety belt T-shirt’ in China

  1. Why is it so unpopular to use seat belts in China?
    One person told me that his belly was too fat and didn’t want pressure on it, I am sure this is not the main reason, lol.

  2. Once again the idiots have devised a way to outsmart all the safeties man has come up with to save them. This is a good thing – nature itself can’t keep up with thinning the herd.

  3. Who is an idiot? Anybody that straps themselves in place so that air bags could beat them to death.

  4. The joke is on the user! Who is the real idiot? Answer: Anybody that would strap themselves in to get beat to death.

  5. In 1989 an Italian psychiatrist Claudio Ciaravolo wanted to study the dynamics of how rumours are spread. So he invented the story of these t-shirts being sold in his home town of Naples. To this day Italian media cites this story as something that really happened but it’s not true – they were never produced

    http://www.ciaravolo.it/maglietta.html

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